Cool China Plastic Parts For Car Manufacturer images

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

Some cool china plastic parts for car manufacturer images:

92041 china clay tankers Wembley to Dollands Moor 6B37
china plastic parts for car manufacturer
Image by train_photos
DB Schenker class 92 number 92041 named "Vaughan Williams" painted in EWS two tone railfreight grey livery and a three ‘O’ shaped channel tunnel roundel logo working 6B37 hauling empty NACCO (North American Car Corporation) tankers from Wembley European Freight Operating Centre to Dollands Moor Sidings as part of their return journey to Antwerpen (Antwerp) Docks, Belgium from Irvine Scotland on 28 February 2014. For the route taken see (<a target="_blank" hr

Advertisements

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

Some cool china plastic parts for car manufacturer images:

92041 china clay tankers Wembley to Dollands Moor 6B37
china plastic parts for car manufacturer
Image by train_photos
DB Schenker class 92 number 92041 named "Vaughan Williams" painted in EWS two tone railfreight grey livery and a three ‘O’ shaped channel tunnel roundel logo working 6B37 hauling empty NACCO (North American Car Corporation) tankers from Wembley European Freight Operating Centre to Dollands Moor Sidings as part of their return journey to Antwerpen (Antwerp) Docks, Belgium from Irvine Scotland on 28 February 2014. For the route taken see (www.flickr.com/photos/99279135@N05/14289727859/). 92041 traveled down to Wembley earlier in the day as 6M76 photographed at Northampton by Nigel Gould (www.flickr.com/photos/60599026@N05/12831694204/in/photoli…). Prior to this Brian Denton photogrphed these tankers filled with china clay slurry heading northwards towards Scotland on 26 February 2014 (www.flickr.com/photos/brian_dentons_linesidephotos-europe…). Once the tankers arrive back at Antwerpen Docks they are reloaded with china clay slurry (kaolin) made from rocks rich in kaolinite, Al2Si2O5(OH)4, imported from Brazil. This slurry is transported to Irvine, Scotland by 6S94 where it is used by the Finnish company, UPM-Kymmene (United Paper Mills Ltd) Corporation’s at their Caledonian Paper Mill to produce lightweight coated paper for printing magazines, catalogues and brochures.

92041 was assembled by the BRUSH Traction Company Loughborough in 1996, from sub-contracted components e.g. Procor UK bodyshell, Asea Brown Boveri (ABB Rail) traction converters and GTO (Gate Turn-Off thyristor) controlled via the MICAS-S2 electronics system, retractable third rail collector shoes and pantographs made by Brecknell Willis, the engraved aluminium BRUSH traction works plates made by J M Ranger Limited of Leicester and cast aluminium based alloy Crew Depot plaque produced by David Newton of Nottingham. For track to train communications class 92s were fitted with the Siemens International Train Radio (ITR) "chameleon" system which could automatically change over to match local ground systems e.g. at international boarders and allowed the driver to select from a range of language settings. STS Signals Ltd supplied electronic Train Protection and Warning System (TPWS) control units for class 92s as an add on to the Automatic Warning System (AWS) equipment. STS Signals Ltd also developed a twin-lightweight AWS receiver for use on class 92s so that only one receiver was needed to detect both standard strength magnets on lines powered by AC overhead wires (Rx1) as well as the extra strength magnets used on DC third rail lines (Rx2). All non-metallic components of the class 92 were either certified for Eurotunnels fire regulations by the manufacturers or where suppliers could not provide this information products such as the divers seat (made by Chapman Seating Limited) and plastic push buttons were fire tested by BRUSH.

Read more about Cool China Plastic Parts For Car Manufacturer images

Untitled (In Memoriam, Jon Claremont)

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

Some cool high-quality auto mould images:

Untitled (In Memoriam, Jon Claremont)
high-quality auto mould
Image by jay-chilli
From the photoblog Chillimatic

Posting a photo of a shop called "Party World" here is an odd way to memorialize someone. Bear with me, I’ll explain further down the page. Firstly a little on how I came to know about Jon Claremont and his work.

The service provider for my photoblog, Chillimatic, is called Expressions. Expressions won’t be rivalling

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

Some cool high-quality auto mould images:

Untitled (In Memoriam, Jon Claremont)
high-quality auto mould
Image by jay-chilli
From the photoblog Chillimatic

Posting a photo of a shop called "Party World" here is an odd way to memorialize someone. Bear with me, I’ll explain further down the page. Firstly a little on how I came to know about Jon Claremont and his work.

The service provider for my photoblog, Chillimatic, is called Expressions. Expressions won’t be rivalling Flickr any time soon and perhaps due to the small number of subscribers, or perhaps due to the good work of the people who run it, Expressions is a genuine ‘online community’ (prior to joining I had thought this phrase an oxymoron) brought together by a shared love of photography.

Some particularly high quality photoblogs are nestled alonside my own (frankly amateurish) site. Chief among these is a blog I discovered during my earliest nose around Expressions called ClaremontPhoto – Jon’s photoblog.

The aesthetic of Jon’s pictures was so different to that which currently prevails in photography that it was a shock when I first landed there. My eyes had become too accustomed to the diamond-sharp, perfectly colour-balanced images that digital technology has made possible to immediately accept photos taken with film cameras and developed at the local One Hour Photo. Jon’s snaps were often blurry and overexposed with no apparent colour scheme. His subjects rarely sat nicely in measured compositions.

Even when he was photographing the patrons of the shabby café-bars of Montemor-o-Novo, the town in Portugal where he lived – subjects who were in fact seated and immobile – there was always a touch of anarchy, a touch of humanity, his photos were alive. He once remarked in an e-mail to me that he didn’t do “pretty pictures”. He was wrong. His photos were beautiful, and in a way that all those diamond-sharp digital images could never be.

I started leaving comments on Jon’s site, he on mine, and our intermittent e-mail exchanges began. Just as one had to get past the aesthetic shock and look carefully at Jon’s photos to fully appreciate them so he looked carefully at others’. More than once he remarked on something in one of my shots that I hadn’t noticed myself. For this reason his words of encouragement were valuable to me; his appreciation was genuine.

Jon’s warmth of character was a further quality as apparent in his photos as his mails. Most of his shots were of the inhabitants of Montemor, a village lost in the countryside 40 miles to the east of Lisbon, a town not pretty enough for tourism nor rich enough for chain store homogeneity.

Similarly, Montemor’s inhabitants are neither charmingly rustic nor the neat, presentable Gap-clad men and women that the global economy has moulded. They’re a scruffy lot, spending their evenings sitting awkwardly on bar furniture, drinking cheap beer straight from the bottle, looking up slack-jawed at the football on the telly. In viewing Jon’s photos I was often reminded of Oscar Wilde’s famous aphorism “Work is the curse of the drinking classes”.

Most photographers, I think, would maintain a certain distance between themselves and such subjects, one that would translate into a mocking tone in their photos or a falsely reverent one: ostensibly honouring such ‘salt of the earth’ characters, covertly pitying them. Jon did none of that; the section at ClaremontPhoto compiling his ‘people’ shots is titled “Friends and Neighbours”. Quite right, they were not his subjects, he was one of them. The warmth and camaraderie so apparent in his photography were equally evident in his words to me.

Soon after I was first in contact with Jon he was appointed as Community Ambassador at Expressions, bringing to the members’ attention the work of other Expressions contributors, and continuing to offer words of encouragement and genuine appreciation to so many of us. He was very much the glue in our online community and I know that I am not alone in saying how greatly missed he will be.

I learnt of Jon’s passing on Friday and that same day Shanolyno, a fellow Expressions user, posted a comment on my photoblog. I mailed him to say thanks and told him the sad news. His words in reply voiced my own thoughts perfectly: “Seems strange to mourn for someone that I feel I know so well, yet I never met.”

I never met Jon Claremont either, I never even spoke to him and yet he touched me in some way, he inspired me, and I will miss him. For those that did know this clearly exceptional man, his family and friends, the loss must be very great indeed and my thoughts are with them.

So, the photo of “Party World”. It was taken in July of last year with a DSLR which I’d just bought, on the day I arrived in Sardinia, my holiday destination. During the preceding months I had spent much time on photography: taking photographs, tending to my website, reading about photography, viewing the work of others and occasionally exchanging e-mails with Jon.

Shortly before I left we had a quick exchange about Martin Parr, whose work we both admired. I wrote: “Regarding Martin Parr, yes the man is a genius, but I also kind of hate him because it’s become impossible to take photos in certain areas (supermarkets and seaside towns in the UK particularly) without thinking of his brilliant photos. He kind of owns all that now. If I ever find myself in a run down bar in Portugal and I’m unable to take photos because you’ve taken all the ideas and own that environment I’ll let you know.”

When I arrived in Olbia this throwaway comment had transformed into prophecy. Maybe it was the intensity of the sunlight (in Jon’s outdoor shots the walls and streets of Montemor appeared sun-bleached) or maybe it was the slightly tattered look that much of Olbia still has despite a recent influx of tourists courtesy of EasyJet, but I was unable to take pictures of the place, I saw Jon’s photos everywhere.

Thwarted in my attempts to take my own photos I decided to produce some imitation Claremonts. I turned the exposure up a notch to get the bleached look, switched the focus setting to “auto” to lose some sharpness and took a couple of shots of shop fronts which I imagined wouldn’t be out of place in Montemor. This shot was the most successful. I had intended to send it to him but, very regrettably now, never got round to it.

But "Party World", though? Surely not the best way to memorialize someone? Like I say – bear with me. This shop, despite its apparent banality, despite the cheap plastic knick-knacks it displays in the window, proudly proclaims itself “Party World” and this is in keeping with the meaning I read behind many of Jon’s photos. Despite the tawdriness of their surroundings; despite their shabby clothes; despite the cheap beer they’re given to drink every night; despite the fact that they live in a forgotten hinterland, held there just above the breadline; despite the fact that they’re old and working class (both characteristics that were once a source of pride but not so much these days); despite all this and much more, the people in Jon’s photos are mostly smiling. They’re happy.

My favourite of Jon’s photos is of a frail old man who sells lottery tickets from in front of a bar. According to the text accompanying the photo he’s there every week with the same patter, every week he has “the big one”. There he is – leaning against a rubbish bin, an expression of rapt wonder on his face as he eyes the little scraps of paper in his hand which, despite the 10-million-to-one odds, are going to bring in the jackpot. The Don Quixote of Montemor, he is both a fool and a hero.

As summations of the human condition go, it’s hard to beat. We are born into a world without purpose or meaning where there is but one truth: that one day, soon, we will be gone from it, obliterated. We have no chance; we are playing a machine we will never beat, which metes out suffering so much more than joy… And yet we still believe, holy fools that we are, that we’re going to land "the big one", that “A vida é uma festa!” Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to Party World.

So rest in peace, Jon Claremont, and thank you for showing me all this.

If you’ve read this far I hope you’ll click on the link for ClaremontPhoto. Many of his older photos (including the lottery ticket seller) have disappeared but there remain many photos of exceptional quality.

Image from page 46 of “Canadian foundryman (1921)” (1921)
high-quality auto mould
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: canfoundryman1921toro
Title: Canadian foundryman (1921)
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Foundries Foundry workers
Publisher: Toronto : MacLean Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
while mold-ing sand experts seem to put most stresson the size of the grain, and as a secondin importance the amount of bond, butthe shape of the grain and the chemicalContinued on page 39 January, 1921 39 NEW AND IMPROVED EQUIPMENT A Record of Machinery Development Tending Towards Higher Quality,Output and Efficiency in Foundry, Pattern and Metal Work Generally THE AUTO SAND-CUTTINGMACHINE The American Foundry EquipmentCompany, 366 Madison avenue, NewYork City, are putting on the market anovel device in the way of a machine forcutting over sand heaps. As shown inthe illustration, it is a combination ofspiral blades revolving on an axle in a The distinguishing feature of this newladle design is the fact that the gearingis mounted on the trunnion instead ofon the bail. Consequently any distortionof the bail or bowl will not interfere withthe alignment of the gears. The man-ner in which the gear bracket engagesthe bail is clearly illustrated in photoherewith. A further advantage of this

Text Appearing After Image:
THE MODERN METHOD OF CUTTING UP THE SAND HEAP. similar manner to those of a lawn mow-er, but being right and left, and con-verging towards the center. The machineis motor-driven and straddles over thesand. When a sand heap is to be cutover the machine is put at one end ofthe floor and is automatically drivenover the sand. As the machine movesalong, the blades revolve and break upthe lumps, thoroughly mix the sand andpile it up in a long windrow the same asa molder would do with a shovel, but more uniform in temper. If desiredto have the sand in a pile against thewall the machine can be run over theheap as often as required until the sandis back far enough. The sand is notthrown at the heap, but is thrown aboutfour feet into the air and falls on thepile in the form of dust. The machineis known as the Auto Sand-Cutter andis made in two types; the traction typeas shown in the illustration and thecrane type, which is suspended from theshop crane and which is especially adapt-ed to situati

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read more about Untitled (In Memoriam, Jon Claremont)

Cool Chinese Fast Mold Manufacturers images

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

Some cool chinese fast mold manufacturers images:

Read more about Cool Chinese Fast Mold Manufacturers images

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

Some cool chinese fast mold manufacturers images:

Read more about Cool Chinese Fast Mold Manufacturers images

1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

A few nice auto fender mould design images I found:

1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan
auto fender mould design
Image by glennfrancosimmons_
This 1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan was displayed at the 2010 Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“The Cadillac Sixty Special name has been used by Cadillac to denote a special model since the 1938 Harley Earl-Bill Mitchell-designed Series 60 derivative,” according to Wikipedia. “The Sixty Special name would soon be synonymous for some of Cadillac’s most luxurious vehicles. …

“Starting in 1940, and for the remainder of its existence, the Sixty Special woul

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

A few nice auto fender mould design images I found:

1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan
auto fender mould design
Image by glennfrancosimmons_
This 1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan was displayed at the 2010 Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“The Cadillac Sixty Special name has been used by Cadillac to denote a special model since the 1938 Harley Earl-Bill Mitchell-designed Series 60 derivative,” according to Wikipedia. “The Sixty Special name would soon be synonymous for some of Cadillac’s most luxurious vehicles. …

“Starting in 1940, and for the remainder of its existence, the Sixty Special would be Fleetwood marketed, enjoying higher-priced molding, trim and upholstery like the Series 75 and 90. Thus it took over the Series 70’s place, which was dropped for the 1938 model year, as Cadillac’s most luxurious owner-driven large model — a role it would fill through 1976.

“1941 was the last year of Harley Earl and Bill Mitchell’s original Sixty Special design, as an all-new 1942 model was in the works. Many consider the 1941 to the most beautiful of this series, though Mitchell himself favored the clean lines of the original 1938 model. For the first time, Cadillac had its own front end design—the ‘tombstone’ grille with a high center section flanked by lower side sections — that would identify Cadillacs for years to come.

“The new ‘face’ blended well with the original body, and the rear fenders now held full skirts. For 1941, the wheelbase was reduced by 1 inch (25 mm), down to 126 in (3,200 mm).

“Sixty Specials showed a 5 price increase (for the first time) to ,195. Power was still supplied by the same 346 cu in (5.67 L) Cadillac engine as before, but was now rated at 150 hp (110 kW). Production totals include 3,878 Touring sedans (including 185 with the sun roof option), and 220 Imperial sedans (now priced at ,345).

“Only one Sixty Special Town Car was made this year and used on the auto show circuit before being purchased by film director, C.B. DeMille. Featuring the leather-covered roof, it was the last one to come from Cadillac-Fleetwood.

“There were nearly 17,900 Sixty Specials made from 1938 to 1941, including about a dozen custom-bodied versions.”

1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan
auto fender mould design
Image by glennfrancosimmons_
This 1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan was displayed at the 2010 Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“The Cadillac Sixty Special name has been used by Cadillac to denote a special model since the 1938 Harley Earl-Bill Mitchell-designed Series 60 derivative,” according to Wikipedia. “The Sixty Special name would soon be synonymous for some of Cadillac’s most luxurious vehicles. …

“Starting in 1940, and for the remainder of its existence, the Sixty Special would be Fleetwood marketed, enjoying higher-priced molding, trim and upholstery like the Series 75 and 90. Thus it took over the Series 70’s place, which was dropped for the 1938 model year, as Cadillac’s most luxurious owner-driven large model — a role it would fill through 1976.

“1941 was the last year of Harley Earl and Bill Mitchell’s original Sixty Special design, as an all-new 1942 model was in the works. Many consider the 1941 to the most beautiful of this series, though Mitchell himself favored the clean lines of the original 1938 model. For the first time, Cadillac had its own front end design—the ‘tombstone’ grille with a high center section flanked by lower side sections — that would identify Cadillacs for years to come.

“The new ‘face’ blended well with the original body, and the rear fenders now held full skirts. For 1941, the wheelbase was reduced by 1 inch (25 mm), down to 126 in (3,200 mm).

“Sixty Specials showed a 5 price increase (for the first time) to ,195. Power was still supplied by the same 346 cu in (5.67 L) Cadillac engine as before, but was now rated at 150 hp (110 kW). Production totals include 3,878 Touring sedans (including 185 with the sun roof option), and 220 Imperial sedans (now priced at ,345).

“Only one Sixty Special Town Car was made this year and used on the auto show circuit before being purchased by film director, C.B. DeMille. Featuring the leather-covered roof, it was the last one to come from Cadillac-Fleetwood.

“There were nearly 17,900 Sixty Specials made from 1938 to 1941, including about a dozen custom-bodied versions.”

Read more about 1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan

Image from page 583 of “The World almanac and encyclopedia” (1899)

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

A few nice china box mold images I found:

Image from page 583 of “The World almanac and encyclopedia” (1899)
china box mold
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: worldalmanacency1899newy
Title: The World almanac and encyclopedia
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:<b

(Posted from www.automoldchina.com)

A few nice china box mold images I found:

Image from page 583 of “The World almanac and encyclopedia” (1899)
china box mold
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: worldalmanacency1899newy
Title: The World almanac and encyclopedia
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Almanacs, American Statistics
Publisher: New York : Press Pub. Co. (The New York World)
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
RITTEN GUARANTEE* •..••.•nexSnCxCx*-**-**-** Send for FREE book to ..QUENCER.. 400 WEST 57th STREET, NEW YORK. Hive your drtsggist order 5t for yott.663 ^**^ •^-^^•*- uiii^fnijininjiuf jimwi^^wwwwww*«i P^a^^wgww^Hiiwvw^jMg;.^;^-^^^^ rrn~ ill-iirgiriiininiiriiwi imiiigmn i i. i .. ij^uiiin. TELEPHONE yiBr-Sm. STR^T, PETER KELLER f MASON AND BUILDER. :SK JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO- OFFICE, 257 WEST 42d STREET,NE YORK. F. W» DEVOE & CO/S Artists Tube Colors. CANVAS, ACADEMY BOARDS, FINE BRUSHESfor OIL and WATER-COLOR PAINTING, etc The Standard Quality/ Fill youf sketch box with F. W. Devoc & Co/sTube Colors* F. W# Devoe & Co/s Colors are g^round jto that consistency desired by professional artists* Supplies for • •« CHINA PAINTING, MODELING, ETCHING, PEN-AND-INK DRAWING. PYROGRAPHY, RiINIATURE PAINT-ING. EVERYTHING IN ARTISTS MATERIALS.PAINTS AND VARNISHES. *^ *^ Send for Catalogue* J* j* Fulton St.. cor. William, 176 Randolph St., NEW YORX 6e4 CHICAGO.

Text Appearing After Image:
■»<W^l<Wf^lW^ ; NBW YORK, 1828, NEW TORK, 1899, ESTABLISHED 74 YEARS. THADDEUS DAVIDS CO.; MANUFACTURSRS OF Writing Fluids f COPYING INKS, 8BAI4ING WAX, INDELIBLE INK, MUCILAGE, RVBBER STAMP INK, WAFERS,LETTERINE or SHOW CARD INK, ETC. OUR WRITING FLUIDS ARE USED BY The World, United States Government Departments, Public Schools of New York and Brooklyn, Adams, American, and Wells, Fargo Express Cos., Western Union Tele- j graph Co., Penn. R.R., N. Y., L. E. & Was. R.R., Del., Lac. & Wes, R.R., Postal j Telegraph Cable Co., and other Large Concerns too numerous to mention. Address: i THADDEUS DAVIDS CO., new york,n.y. THE WORLD HMOULDlNGSDRYiNGBLflNKETS SUPPLIED BY HENRY R. HALLETT, 465 Bourse Building, PHILADELPHIA, PA.Matrix Paper, Moulding Blankets, Stereo. Tissue, Drying Blankets. Warehouse, 134 Pearl St. Telephone, i283 Broad, SAMUEL LEWIS, Housefumishing Specialties For Hotels, Clubs, and Institutions, Anything and everything in the supply line from a dust panto

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 474 of “The Century cook book : with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence” (1909)
china box mold
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924086757774
Title: The Century cook book : with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Ronald, Mary, 1844-1903
Subjects: Cookery, American cbk
Publisher: New York : Century co.
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
arians, cornstarch,etc.; Nos. 3 and 4, ring molds. Illustration No. 3.—No. 1, jelly mold packed in iceready to be filled; No. 2, smaller mold to fit insidefor double molding. niustration No. 4.—Pastry bag and tubes. Illustration No. 5.—Paper for filtering fruit juices. Illustration No. 6.—No. 1, lace papers to use undercake, puddings, jellies, individual creams, bonbons,etc.; also for timbales; No. 2, paper boxes and chinacups to use for individual souffles, biscuits, glaceoranges and grapes, creamed strawberries, and cher-ries; also for creamed chicken, and fish, salpicon, etc. The china cups are useful for the latter purposes. The rectangular paper boxes are easily made. Forboxes SJxlf inches, cut heavy unruled writing paperinto pieces 5|x7i inches; fold down an edge twoinches wide all around; fold it back again on itself,giving a border one inch broad. Cut the comers atthe black line, as shown in diagram, and fold the boxtogether. The ends will fit under the folds, and hold

Text Appearing After Image:
EGG WHIPS No. 1. 1. Dover Beater.a. Wire Spoon. Wire WtaprDaisy Beater.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read more about Image from page 583 of “The World almanac and encyclopedia” (1899)